ROLL OF HONOUR

They shall not grow old as we who are left grow old.
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
WE WILL REMEMBER THEM

 

Forenames Surname Rank Date Of Death Age Regiment/Service Nationality Cemetery/Memorial Name
ALFRED WILLIAM  IZZARD Private 14/10/1917 24 Royal Fusiliers / Labour Corps UK BUFFS ROAD CEMETERY
ALFRED IZZARD Corporal 30/12/1917 27 North Staffordshire Regiment UK RIBECOURT BRITISH CEMETERY
ALBERT EDWARD  IZZARD Aircraftman 2nd Class 19/02/1941 23 Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve UK RUSTHALL (ST. PAUL) NEW CHURCHYARD
ALBERT WILLIAM IZZARD Corporal 15/09/1916 26 Cameroonians (Scottish Rifles) UK THIEPVAL MEMORIAL
ALBERT ALLEN  IZZARD Rifleman 5/6/1915 23 King's Royal Rifle Corps UK YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL
ARNOLD OSWALD THOMAS  IZZARD Private 12/12/1918 31 Royal Marine Light Infantry UK HASLAR ROYAL NAVAL CEMETERY
ARTHUR ALBERT  IZZARD Private 30/01/1919 24 Bedfordshire Regiment UK ST. ALBANS CEMETERY
ARTHUR WILLIAM HENRY  IZZARD Private 29/07/1940 36 Australian Army Personnel Depot Australian CLARENCE TOWN CEMETERY
AUBREY FENWICK  IZZARD Flying Officer 22/09/1942 23 Royal Canadian Air Force Canadian MALTA MEMORIAL
BERTRAM JOHN  IZZARD Lance Corporal 8/8/1918 25 Canadian Infantry (Quebec Regiment) Canadian VIMY MEMORIAL
CLIFFORD  IZZARD Private 8/6/1916 34 Royal Warwickshire Regiment UK CITADEL NEW MILITARY CEMETERY, FRICOURT
CECIL WILLIAM  IZZARD Private 12/9/1944 22 Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Regiment UK SINGAPORE MEMORIAL
CHARLES BENJAMIN  IZZARD Civilian 2/3/1944 40 Civilian War Dead UK ST. NEOTS, RURAL DISTRICT
CHARLES  IZZARD Private 13/11/1916 35 Bedfordshire Regiment UK THIEPVAL MEMORIAL
CLARENCE HENRY MARK  IZZARD Private 19/03/1945 24 Australian Infantry Australian LABUAN MEMORIAL
CLARENCE  IZZARD Private 7/10/1915 20 Royal Welsh Fusiliers UK ALEXANDRIA WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY
COLIN ROY  IZZARD Flying Officer 24/02/1947 29 Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve UK EASEBOURNE (ST. MARY) NEW CHURCHYARD
CYRIL BICKFORD ISARD Captain 15/08/1915 25 London Regiment UK HELLES MEMORIAL
EDGAR  IZZARD Private 5/9/1916 21 Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) UK HEILLY STATION CEMETERY, MERICOURT-L'ABBE
EDGAR  IZZARD Rifleman 13/05/1915 19 Rifle Brigade UK YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL
ERNEST WALTER  IZZARD Corporal 31/07/1917 31 Hertfordshire Regiment UK YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL
ERNEST  IZZARD Private 25/09/1915 33 Royal Sussex Regiment UK LOOS MEMORIAL
EVA GLADYS  IZZARD Civilian 20/06/1944 44 Civilian War Dead UK POPLAR, METROPOLITAN BOROUGH
FRANCIS GEORGE  IZZARD Private 21/04/1915 23 Bedfordshire Regiment UK YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL
FRANK THOMAS IZARD Private 4/10/1917 27 Royal Warwickshire Regiment UK TYNE COT CEMETERY
FRANCIS VALLENCE IZARD Captain 16/02/1915 34 Royal Garrison Artillery UK KRANJI WAR CEMETERY SINGAPORE
FREDERICK CHARLES  IZZARD Private 10/9/1918 26 London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers) UK LONDON CEMETERY LONGUEVAL
FREDERICK IZZARD Cook 27/02/1941 43 Merchant Navy UK TOWER HILL MEMORIAL
FREDERICK THOMAS  IZZARD Private 29/09/1918 20 Norfolk Regiment UK VIS-EN-ARTOIS MEMORIAL
FREDERICK  IZZARD Cook 27/02/1941 43 Merchant Navy UK TOWER HILL MEMORIAL
GEORGE ALFRED  ISARD Rifleman 2/11/1918 30 London Regiment (Queen's Westminster Rifles) UK STE. MARIE CEMETERY, LE HAVRE
GEORGE EDWARD  IZARD Private 25/08/1917 21 Australian Infantry, A.I.F. Australian TROIS ARBRES CEMETERY, STEENWERCK
GEORGE HENRY  IZARD Second Lieutenant 10/8/1918 34 Norfolk Regiment UK RIBEMONT COMMUNAL CEMETERY  Somme
GEORGE WALTER  IZZARD Private 29/07/1942 19 Middlesex Regiment UK TOTTENHAM CEMETERY
GEORGE  ISZARD Lance Corporal 1/10/1942 24 Middlesex Regiment UK SAI WAN MEMORIAL
GEORGE  IZZARD Private 5/8/1916 38 Royal Fusiliers UK DERNANCOURT COMMUNAL CEMETERY
HENRY GEORGE IZARD Lance Corporal 10/7/1918 22 London Regiment (City of London Rifles) UK CONTAY BRITISH CEMETERY, CONTAY
HENRY GEORGE  IZZARD Gunner 3/12/1916 24 Royal Garrison Artillery UK FAUBOURG D'AMIENS CEMETERY, ARRAS
HORACE IZZARD Private 6/9/1918 20 Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment) UK ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, ROUEN
HENRY IZZARD Private 11/10/1918 34 Dorsetshire Regiment UK MONTAY-NEUVILLY ROAD CEMETERY, MONTAY
HARRY IZZARD Private 22/04/1916 28 Middlesex Regiment UK CAMBRIDGE CITY CEMETERY
HARRY CHARLES  IZZARD Lance Corporal 1/6/1940 28 Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Regiment UK DUNKIRK MEMORIAL
HARRY HARLAND LAMB/ISARD Rifleman 3/5/1916 22 London Rifle Brigade UK YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL
HARRY HOWARD  IZZARD Serjeant 29/12/1917 33 Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) UK KIRKEE 1914-1918 MEMORIAL
HARRY  ISEARD Lance Corporal 25/09/1915 23 London Regiment (London Irish Rifles) UK LOOS MEMORIAL
HARRY ERNEST IZZARD Private 20/04/1918 19 Training Reserve UK CLANDOWN (HOLY TRINITY) CHURCHYARD
HENRY WALTER  IZZARD Engineman 17/12/1918 38 Royal Naval Reserve UK GRIMSBY (SCARTHO ROAD) CEMETERY
HERBERT CECIL ERNEST  IZZARD Rifleman 19/04/1916 22 London Regiment UK CABARET-ROUGE BRITISH CEMETERY, SOUCHEZ
HERBERT  IZZARD Private 24/04/1917 36 Wiltshire Regiment UK DOIRAN MEMORIAL
HENRY HERMAN IZZARD Private 26/03/1917 22 Herefordshire Regiment UK JERUSALEM MEMORIAL
HORACE HENRY  IZZARD Private 21/02/1919 21 Middlesex Regiment UK WEEDON BEC CEMETERY
HUBERT EDWARD  ISARD Corporal 19/07/1944 24 Rifle Brigade UK RANVILLE WAR CEMETERY
JOHN FRANCIS  IZARD Sergeant 1/7/1942 32 Royal Australian Artillery Australian RABAUL MEMORIAL
JOHN FREDERICK  IZZARD Lance Corporal 30/12/1917 30 Royal Fusiliers UK THIEPVAL MEMORIAL
JOHN HENRY  IZZARD Able Seaman 27/08/1943 19 Royal Navy UK PORTSMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL
JOHN LAURANCE  IZZARD Lieutenant 26/04/1943 38 General List UK TRINCOMALEE WAR CEMETERY
JOHN WILLIAM  IZARD Private 26/03/1917 20 Royal Sussex Regiment UK JERUSALEM MEMORIAL
LAURENCE THEODORE  IZZARD Flying Officer 8/12/1942 26 Royal Canadian Air Force Canadian RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL
LAWRENCE IZARD Private 20/08/1916 21 Australian Infantry, A.I.F. Australian VILLERS-BRETONNEUX MEMORIAL
MARTIN JAMES  IZZARD Private 2/8/1917 22 Hertfordshire Regiment UK HARLEBEKE NEW BRITISH CEMETERY
OLIVER GEORGE  IZZARD Private 24/12/1916 35 Dorsetshire Regiment UK GUILDEN MORDEN BURIAL GROUND.
PERCY IZZARD Rifleman 30/03/1917 22 London Regiment (Post Office Rifles) UK BEDFORD HOUSE CEMETERY
PERCIVAL CHARLES  IZZARD Private 4/2/1919 43 Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment) UK COLCHESTER CEMETERY
PERCY JOHN ISARD Private 30/06/1916 23 Royal Sussex Regiment UK CABARET-ROUGE BRITISH CEMETERY, SOUCHEZ
PERCY  IZZARD Private 13/11/1916 23 Hertfordshire Regiment UK THIEPVAL MEMORIAL
PHILLIP DAVID  IZZARD Sergeant 14/02/1944 19 Royal Air Force UK CITY OF WESTMINSTER MILL HILL CEMETERY
ROBERT EARL IZZARD Private 30/08/1918 28 Royal Warwickshire Regiment UK VAULX HILL CEMETERY
RIXON  IZZARD Private 29/06/1915 20 Bedfordshire Regiment UK YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL
ROY BERNARD  IZZARD Private 16/07/1943 21 Cheshire Regiment UK CATANIA WAR CEMETERY, SICILY
SIDNEY BRYDON  IZZARD Lance Corporal 13/11/1916 23 Bedfordshire Regiment UK ANCRE BRITISH CEMETERY, BEAUMONT-HAMEL
SEYMOUR ARCHIBALD  IZZARD Private 27/08/1918 20 Irish Guards UK MORY ABBEY MILITARY CEMETERY, MORY
THOMAS HENRY IZZARD Private 24/12/1917 30 East Yorkshire Regiment UK HEUDICOURT COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION
THOMAS IZZARD Private 8/12/1918 23 Canadian Machine Gun Corps Canadian SEAFORD CEMETERY
THEODORE DOUGLAS  IZARD Lieutenant (E) 29/04/1944 26 Royal Canadian Navy Canadian HALIFAX MEMORIAL
THOMAS HAROLD     ISARD Rifleman 3/9/1916 26 Rifle Brigade UK THIEPVAL MEMORIAL
THOMAS  ISSARD Private 15/10/1915 20 North Staffordshire Regiment UK BETHUNE TOWN CEMETERY
THOMAS  ISZARD Rifleman 6/8/1915 20 King's Royal Rifle Corps UK YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL
THOMAS IZZARD Private 14/01/1917 37 Royal Fusiliers UK LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY
WILLIAM EDWIN  IZZARD Serjeant 27/03/1916 29 Royal Fusiliers UK DICKEBUSCH NEW MILITARY CEMETERY
WILLIAM FREDERICK T B  ISZARD Rifleman 23/04/1917 19 Rifle Brigade UK TRESCAULT COMMUNAL CEMETERY
WILLIAM CHARLES  IZZARD Trooper 3/7/1942 37 Royal Armoured Corps UK ALAMEIN MEMORIAL
WILLIAM GEORGE  IZZARD Lance Corporal 12/7/1942 31 Australian Army Medical Corps Australian EL ALAMEIN WAR CEMETERY
WILLIAM HENRY  IZZARD Private 2/7/1918 20 Royal Sussex Regiment UK PERNES BRITISH CEMETERY
WILLIAM JESSE  IZZARD Rifleman 8/10/1916 18 London Regiment (First Surrey Rifles) UK THIEPVAL MEMORIAL
WILLIAM JOHN  IZARD Private 6/4/1916 21 Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) UK BETHUNE TOWN CEMETERY
WILLIAM LYALL  IZZARD Private 7/6/1944 22 North Nova Scotia Highlanders, R.C.I.C. Canadian BENY-SUR-MER CANADIAN CEMETERY, REVIERS
WILLIAM  IZZARD Stoker 1st Class 22/09/1914 26 Royal Navy UK CHATHAM NAVAL MEMORIAL

Commonwealth War Graves Commission is acknowledged as the source of the material. http://www.cwgc.org

Also died in the Boer War

Henry Alfred Izzard He was born in 1st quarter of 1879 Holborn Middlesex .He was the only son of Henry Alfred Izzard and Ann Robbins. He died of disease probably enteric fever (Typhoid) on 19 May 1900 at Bloemfontein South Africa. He was in the Royal Marine Light Infantry and attached to the Naval Brigade Service No 9084 . He was attached to HMS Monarch which was the first seagoing warship to carry her guns in turrets, and the first British warship to carry guns of 12-inch (300 mm) calibre, she was acting as a guardship at Simons Bay South Africa. He was awarded The Queen's Mediterranean Medal

 

 

WORLD WAR ONE MEDALS

1914 Star

The 1914 Star, also known as the Mons Star, was a campaign medal of the British Empire, for service in World War one. This Bronze Star was authorised in April, 1917, to be awarded to those who served in France or Belgium on the strength of a unit, or service in either of those countries between 5th August and midnight on 22nd/23rd November 1914. The former date is the day after Britain's declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

Recipients were officers and men of the pre-war British army, specifically the British Expeditionary Force (B.E.F or the Old Contemptibles), who landed in France soon after the outbreak of the War and who took part in the Retreat from Mons (hence the nickname 'Mons Star'). 365,622 were awarded in total. Recipients of this medal also received the British War Medal and Victory Medal. These three medals were sometimes irreverently referred to as Pip, Squeak and Wilfred.

In October, 1919, the King graciously pleased to approved and sanctioned the award of the bar to this star to all those who had been ‘under fire’ in France or Belgium during, or between the above dates.

It should be noted that there are two categories of recipients (1) those who served the requisite period under fire, and (2) those who served the same period not under fire.

The Bar is of bronze and bears on it “5th Aug – 22nd Nov. 1914” There are small holes on each corner enabling it to be sewn on to the ribbon. Those entitled to the bar wear a small silver rose in the centre of the ribbon when the medal is not worn.

A very similar medal, the 1914-15 Star, was also issued, but no person could receive both awards. 

1914/15 Star Medal

The 1914 – 15 Star was a campaign medal of the British Empire, for service in World War one.

This Star is identical with the 1914 Star in every respect except that the centre scroll bears the dates “1914- 15” and the two small scrolls bearing “Aug” and “Nov” are omitted.

The 1914-15 Star was approved in 1918, for issue to officers and men of British Imperial Forces who saw service in any theatre of war against the Central Powers between 5th August, 1914, and 31st December, 1915, except those eligible of the 1914 Star.

Recipients of this medal also received the British War Medal and Victory Medal - it was never awarded singly. These three medals were sometimes irreverently referred to as Pip, Squeak and Wilfred with Pip representing either this medal or the 1914 Star, only one of which could be awarded to a soldier; Squeak represented the British War Medal; and Wilfred represented the Victory Medal.

Recipients of a Mention in Despatches who did not qualify for the Allied victory medal wore a bronze oak leaf on the ribbon of this medal. 

British War Medal

The British War Medal was a campaign medal of the British Empire, for service in World War One. It commemorates some of the most terrible battles the world has ever known. The causalities in the Ypres Salent and on the Somme for 1915 to 1918 were more than our total for the Second World War

The medal was approved in 1919, for issue to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who had rendered service between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918. Officers and men of the Royal Navy, Royal Marines, and Dominion and Colonial naval forces (including reserves) were required to have completed 28 days mobilised service – the medal was automatically awarded in the event of death on active service before the completion of this period.

The medal was later extended to cover and award the services in the period 1919–20 for mine-clearing at sea as well as participation in operations in North and South Russia, the eastern Baltic, Siberia, the Black Sea, and the Caspian.

This medal was issued singly without the Allied Victory Medal to certain regular and mobilized personnel who did not see any fighting. 

Victory Medal

The Victory medal (also called the Inter Allied Victory Medal) is a bronze medal that was awarded to all who received the 1914 Star or 1914-15 Star and, with certain exceptions, to those who received the British War Medal. It was never awarded alone. These three medals were sometimes irreverently referred to as Pip, Squeak and Wilfred.

The medal of which the basic design and ribbon was adopted by Belgium, Brazil, Cuba, Czechoslovakia, France Greece, Italy, Portugal, Romania, Siam, Union of South Africa and the USA in accordance with the decision as taken at the lnter-Allied Peace Conference at Versailles but in a particular form of a historic Greek monument as determined by each nation, with the exception of the nations of the far east who issued the medal but with a different design.

Eligibility for this award consisted of having been mobilized in any of the fighting services and having served in any of the theatres of operations, or at sea, between midnight 4th/5th August, 1914, and midnight, 11th/12th November, 1918. Women who served in any of the various organizations in a theatre of operations were eligible, such as nurses, members of the Women’s Royal Naval Service, Woman Army /auxiliary Corp, Women’s Royal Air Force, canteen staff and members of the many charitable services.

 

 

ALFRED WILLIAM IZZARD Born in 3rd quarter of 1893 to William Izzard and Sarah Ann Powell he was baptised 3 September 1894 at St Peters Church St Albans Hertfordshire he married Ellen Flint in the last quarter of 1915 at St Albans Hertfordshire. He enlisted in the Royal Fusiliers No G/54481 then transferred to the Labour Corps No 63122 He was killed on 14 October 1917 in Belgium and is buried at Buffs Road Cemetery, The cemetery is located to the North East of the town of Ieper. The cemetery was made and used by fighting units (in particular by the 12th, 13th and 14th Royal Sussex and the Royal Artillery) between July 1917 and March 1918 He was awarded the British Medal and the Victory Medal

The Labour Corps is formed

Formed in January 1917, the Corps grew to some 389,900 men (more than 10% of the total size of the Army) by the Armistice. Of this total, around 175,000 were working in the United Kingdom and the rest in the theatres of war. The Corps was manned by officers and other ranks who had been medically rated below the "A1" condition needed for front line service. Many were returned wounded. Labour Corps units were often deployed for work within range of the enemy guns, sometimes for lengthy periods. In April 1917, a number of infantry battalions were transferred to the Corps. The Labour Corps absorbed the 28 ASC Labour Companies between February and June 1917. Labour Corps Area Employment Companies were formed in 1917 for salvage work, absorbing the Divisional Salvage Companies. In the crises of March and April 1918 on the Western Front, Labour Corps units were used as emergency infantry. The Corps always suffered from its treatment as something of a second class organisation: for example, the men who died are commemorated under their original regiment, with Labour Corps being secondary. Researching men of the Corps is made extra difficult by this, as is the fact that few records remain of the daily activities and locations of Corps units.

ALFRED IZZARD was born circa 1890 in Tonbridge area of Kent he was the oldest son of Alfred Edward Elias Izzard and Martha Neve. He married Eva Glover in 1910. He enlisted in the Royal Staffordshire Regiment on 1st January 1915 and was bricklayer by trade. He was a Corporal. He was killed instantly when he was hit by a shell on 30 December 1917 and is buried in Ribecourt British Cemetery Cambrai France. He was awarded the British and Victory Medal

FROM KENT AND SUSSEX COURIER 18 JANUARY 1918

Rusthall

CORPORAL ALBERT IZZARD

Mrs Izzard of 30 Hill View Road Rusthall received a letter on Monday from the Chaplain to the Company informing her of her husband Corpl Albert Izzard having been killed instantly in France by shell on the 30 December 1917 and that he had been revently buried near many of his fallen comrades in France, and a cross placec on the grave. He was 27 years of age and had been in the Army three years joining up in the Kent (Fortress) Engineers but he was later transferred to the North Staffords on being sent out to France on 1 January 1917. He leaves a widow and four young children

 

            

THE BATTLE OF CAMBRAI  (20 November – 7 December 1917)

This was a British campaign of the First World War. Cambrai, in the Nord département (Nord-Pas-de-Calais), was a key supply point for the German Siegfried Stellung (part of the Hindenburg Line) and the nearby Bourlon Ridge would be an excellent gain from which to threaten the rear of the German line to the north. The operation was to include an experimental artillery action. Major General Tudor, Commander Royal Artillery (CRA) of the 9th Division, suggested trying out new artillery-infantry techniques on his sector of the front. During preparations, J. F. C. Fuller, a staff officer with the Royal Tank Corps (RTC), was in the process of looking for a place to use tanks as raiding parties. General Julian Byng, commander of the British Third Army, decided to incorporate them into the attack.The battle is often erroneously noted for being the first mass use of tanks in a combined arms operation. However, the French had deployed large numbers of tanks in April (130+), May (48) and October (92) 1917, and the British more than 200 in Flanders in June and July. Despite the initial success of the Mark IV tanks at Cambrai, German artillery and infantry defences exposed the frailties of their armour and the vehicles became mostly ineffective after the first day. The battle was largely an artillery-infantry engagement that achieved, surprise and technical superiority against strong fortifications but weak German infantry and artillery defences, which were quickly reinforced. The British attack demonstrated that the Hindenburg Line could be penetrated and showed the value of new artillery and infantry methods, such as sound ranging and infiltration tactics that would later play a vital part during the Hundred Days Offensive. The popular perception of the battle as a tank battle was largely from writing by Basil Liddell Hart and J. F. C. Fuller, the latter erroneously claimed credit for the plan. Liddell Hart, whose position as Military Correspondent of the Daily Telegraph and The Times newspapers (1925–1939) gave him great public influence, was a critic of Douglas Haig and attempted to use the battle to indicate a "new" form of doctrine. Several modern studies have rejected their version of events and returned to a view nearer to that of the British Official History.

 

ALBERT EDWARD IZZARD The son of Albert Victor Izzard and Emily Coomber born in 2nd quarter of 1917 at Tunbridge Wells Kent He never married and served with the Royal Air Force Reserves as an Wireless Operator/Air Gunner he died 19 February 1941 in Pwllheli Wales He is buried at Rusthall New Churchyard. Nothing is known of his roll during the war

FROM KENT & SUSSEX COURIER 28 FEBRUARY 1941

AIRCRAFTMAN ALBERT EDWARD IZZARD OF RUSTHALL

Many friends in and around Tunbridge Wells will regret to learn of the death of second class aircraftsman Albert Edward Izzard of the RAF, VR aged 23 whose home was 38 High Street Rusthall Kent.

Aircraftsman Izzard had seen seven months service with the RAF. He volunteered on the outbreak of war, but was not called up untill the following July when he trained as a wireless operator air gunner. Prior to joining up he was a member of the Cross in Hand (Sussex) detachment of the Home Guard. He was a keen scout being a member of the first Speldhurst Troop. In 1932 he completed in the Kent Scout Association Boxing Championship at Mote Park and won the eight stone championship. The funeral tool place at Rusthall Cemetery on Tuesday 25 February. The internment being preceeded by a service at the mission church conducted by Rev. J.M.T. Griffiths and the Rev. J.B.W. Hughes. The hymn song was Hark m Soul and the 23rd Psalm and the Nunc Dimittus were chanted. Mrs Wickens being at the organ

 

 

ALBERT WILLIAM IZZARD The son of Albert J Izzard and Ellen Elizabeth Curtis he was born in Hamilton Scotland in 1890 He joined the Scottish Cameroons the same regiment as his father was in. He never married and was Killed in Action on 16 September 1916 in Flanders Belgium probably in the Battle of the Somme he has no grave but is listed on the Thiepval Memorial on Pier and Face D. His Regiment No was 23058 and was awarded the The Victory and British Medals

ALBERT ALLAN IZZARD He was born on 4 June 1892 at East Horsley Surrey the son of Henry Izzard and Susan Tate. He joined the Kings Royal Rifles as a Rifleman. He went to France on 18 May 1915.He never married and was Killed in Action on 5 June 1915 in Flanders . He has no known grave and is listed on the Ypres Menin Gate Memorial Panel 51 & 53. He was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory Medal and British Medal. His brother George was also Killed in Action in 1916

From Surrey Advertiser 26th June 1915

EAST HORSLEY

A Double Bereavement

Much sympathy is felt with Mr and Mrs Izzard Norrel's Lodge, East Horsley, in the double bereavement which they have sustained. Quite recently they lost a daughter , whose husband is a soldier , and who leaves one little girl, and on arriving home after the funeral they found the sad news awaiting them that their son Pte. Albert Izzard , 8th Battalion Kings Royal Rifles, had been killed in action on June 5th, the very day that his sister died at home. The news of his death was sent by a cousin serving in the same battalion and Lieut. Acland also wrote."It is with the deepest regret and deepest sympathy that i tell you that your son has been killed in action. He was one of the best men in my platoon, and always did his duty cheerfully and well. I hope it be some consolation to you to know that he was killed instantly without pain and doing his duty. He has been given a proper burial at Kemmel. Pte. Izzard was very well known and liked in the village. He was employed as a gardener at Mr Clutton Brock's at Weybridge when war broke out, and had been in Belgium only three weeks at the time of his death

 

Ypres Menim Gate

ARNOLD OSWALD THOMAS IZZARD He was born in January 1888 at Thurlaston Warwickshire and was the son of Thomas Izzard and Eliza Hobday. He joined the Royal Marines Light Infantry and died on 12 December 1918 aboard HMS Sapphire. He is buried in Haslar Royal Naval Cemetery Portsmouth Hampshire. He was the brother of Wilfred Clifford Izzard who was killed in action on 8th June 1916 SEE BELOW

ARTHUR ALBERT IZZARD He was born in the last quarter of 1895 at St Albans in Hertfordshire he was the son of James Izard and Alice Field. He served in the Bedfordshire Regiment Service No 4/7118.  He died 30 January 1919 at Ripon in Yorkshire. Arthur died at Ripon Hospital after returning from captivity in Germany. He is buried at St Albans Cemetery (Hatfield Road) Hertfordshire. He was awarded the Victory Medal and British Medal. He was also awarded the Military Medal. His brother Ernest Walter Izzard was also Killed in Action see below Ernest Walter Izzard

ARTHUR WILLIAM HENRY IZZARD was born in Australia in 1904 he was the son of Arthur Robert and Ettie Beatrice Izzard of Clarence Town New South Wales Australia . He served in the Australian Army Personal Depot and was Killed in Action on 29 July 1940 His Service No was NX45704. He is listed on panel 95 of the Australian War Memorial at Campbell ACT Australia

From the Nambucca and Bellinger News (NSW)

9th August 1940

PRIVATE ARTHUR IZZARD.

Burial with military honours at Clarence Town on Tuesday of last week was accorded Private Arthur Izzard, whose death occurred in Dungog Cottage Hospital on Mon day, July 29. . Deceased contracted influenza in Broadmeadow camp, and went home on sick leave. Pneumonia supervened, and he was removed to Dungog Hospital. Aged 36 years, deceased was a native of Wingham. A detachment of about fifty men in uniform from Broad-meadow camp were detailed to pay last military tribute as pall-bearers, the remainder formed a guard of honour at the home and again at the graveside. The coffin, draped with a Union Jack, and bearing deceased's hat and uniform, was Carried through their lines whilst they stood with reversed arms. After a trumpeter sounded the "Last Post," a firing squad fired a salute over the grave. Deceased was a nephew of Mr. E. C. Izzard (Macksville).

 

 

AUBREY FENWICK IZZARD was born in Canada on 3rd June 1919 he was the son of James Rattaway and Averilla Jane Izzard. He was married to Dorothy Constance and lived at Westboro Ottawa Ontario Prior to joining the Army he was a Brokeridge Clerk and played Football, Basketball and Track Softball. He served as a Flying Officer in Royal Canadian Air force his Service No  was J/5493. He was Killed in Malta on 22 September 1942, his aircraft was damaged while 150 miles East of Malta  by an accompanying Beaufighter while on an operational sortie and was seen to crash in the sea The crew were all presumed lost and he is listed on the Malta Memorial Panel 4 Column 1

 

 

BERTRAM JOHN IZZARD was born on 2 October 1893 in Canada he was married to Lillian and was an Accountant, he joined the Canadian Infantry 42nd Battalion at Toronto Canada on 26 August 1915  and was a Lance Corporal Service No 192798. He was Killed in Action on 8 August 1918 at Vimy Ridge the scene of much fighting by the Canadians. He was killed near Domart by enemy machine gun fire on the morning of August 8th 1918, while with his company advancing to attack enemy positions North of Beaucourt-en-Santerre. His name is listed on the Vimy Memorial

WILFRID CLIFFORD IZZARD was born in 1st quarter of 1882 in Pillerton Warwickshire He married Alice Mason in 1901,and had at least 7 children. He served in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment 2nd Battalion Service No 4450.He entered France on 27 May 1915 He died on 8 June 1916 and is buried in Citadel New Military Cemetery Fricourt France. He was awarded the 1915 Star, British Medal and Victory Medal. His brother Arnold Oswald Thomas Izzard also died as a result of War Service on 12th December 1918 SEE ABOVE

CECIL WILLIAM IZZARD was born in last quarter of 1922 in Ampthill Bedfordshire. He was the son of Frederick William Izzard and Annie Lily Law he served in the Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Regiment 5th Battalion his Service No was 5949582. He was killed on 12 September 1944 aged 22 while a prisoner of war on board the Kamakura Maru in Singapore and is listed on Column 63 of the Singapore Memorial. His brother John Henry Izzard was also killed in World War Two See Below  

The Sinking of Prisoner of War Transport Ships in the Far East (From Wikipedia)

The Chichibu Maru was a Japanese passenger ship which, renamed Kamakura Maru, was sunk during World War II, killing 2,035 soldiers and civilians on board. The Chichibu Maru was built for the Nippon Yusen shipping company by the Yokohama Dock Company in 1930. She had a beam of 22.6 meters, a length of 178 meters and a tonnage of 17,498. Cruising speed was 19 knots, with a maximum of 21 knots. The ship could carry 817 passengers. She differed from her half-sisters, the Asama Maru and the Tatsuta Maru, in her propulsion system, and in having one (rather than two) funnels. Before the war, the ship carried passengers between Yokohama and San Francisco. Prince Takamatsu and Princess Takamatsu also traveled on this ship. She had her name altered twice: first re-spelt Titibu Maru in 1938, following the adoption of Kunrei-shiki romanization; then - upon realizing the name's resemblance to "tit" (a vulgar English term for the female breast) - renamed Kamakura Maru in 1939.In 1942 she was confiscated by the Imperial Japanese Navy to serve as a troop transport ship, and also as hospital ship. On April 28, 1943, the Kamakura Maru, sailing from Manila to Singapore and carrying some 2,500 soldiers and civilians, was torpedoed by the US submarine USS Gudgeon. The ship was hit by two torpedoes and sank within 12 minutes. Four days later, 465 survivors were rescued from the sea by Japanese ships, meaning some 2,035 people were killed.

 

CHARLES BENJAMIN IZZARD was born 3rd quarter of 1904 in Bedford he married Nellie Robinson in April 1938 at Ampthill Bedfordshire. He was Killed as a Civilian at Great Gransden Huntingdonshire, on 2nd March 1944. There was an airfield there at Gransden Lodge Airfield in use during the war so it is possible he was killed there

From Bedfordshire Times and Independent

17th March 1944

As reported last week Mr Charles Benjamin Izzard of Littleworth Wilstead was killed recently at a home counties aerodrome. Mr Izzard was 39 years of age and until 12 months ago had been employed as a bricklayer with his brother Mr J.R.Izzard of Cotton End for whom he had worked for 20 years. At the time of his death he was in the employ of Mr.T.H.Kingerlee and son of Great Gransden. Mr Izzard was the younger son of Mr.J.R.Izzard of Cotton End and leaves a widow Mrs Nellie Izzard. The funeral took place at Baptist Chapel Cotton End.

CHARLES IZZARD was born in last quarter of 1881 at Hitchin Hertfordshire his parents were Alfred Izzard and Mary Clark. Charles married Lizzie Brown in first quarter of 1906 in Hitchin Hertfordshire and had at least one child. He enlisted in the Bedfordshire Regiment and his Service No was 18505. He went to France on 30 September 1915. He was Killed in Action on 13 November 1916 possibly The Battle of the Ancre 13–18 November, this was the final large British attack of the Battle of the Somme in 1916, before the winter weather forced a pause in British attacks until the new year. He has no known grave but is listed on the Thiepval Memorial Pier and Face 2C

CLARENCE HENRY MARK IZZARD Clarence was born on 29 May 1920 at Crows Nest Queensland Australia’ The son of Roger & Bertha Izzard, Clarence enlisted in the A.I.F. on 5 July 1940 at Toowoomba, Queensland and was marched in to the 2/26 Infantry Battalion.
Australian prisoners were first sent to Sandakan, Borneo in 1942 to build an airstrip. On 7 July 1942, those selected as part of "B" Force left Changi bound for the wharves and the ship which would take them to Sandakan. After loading, the ship sat in Singapore Harbour for over 2 days before commencing its journey.
Ten days later they arrived at Borneo, disembarking in the afternoon. During 1942, their life was bearable and they lost very few men but in 1943 there was a change. New Formosan guards and the discovery of an Allied intelligence network led to harsh reprisals.
Those at Sandakan were subjected to ever-harsher conditions - The POW's health and diet deteriorated and, in late 1944, Allied bombing raids caused a further reduction in the men's daily rice ration. By January 1945, their Japanese rice issue stopped altogether and they were given approximately 85 grams per day from accumulated stores built up by the POWs themselves.
Clarence whose Japanese POW number was 853, who participated in the first Death March, died of Beri Beri at Paginatan Camp, and was buried in Paginatan Camp Cemetery.
At this time of the war, Japan knew that things were not going very good for them, so orders were given than no POW's were to be left alive.
Many were brutally murdered with Japanese records reporting the majority of these deaths as dying from Malaria.
His body was unable to be found identified by War Graves after the war and he is remember on Panel 15 of the Labuan Memorial.
He is commemorated in Australia at The Australian War Memorial, Canberra and the POW Memorial Wall at Ballarat, Victoria. His Service No in the Australia Infantry was QX10462. The Sandakan Death Marches were a series of forced marches in Borneo from Sandakan to Ranau which resulted in the deaths of 2345 Allied prisoners of war held captive by the Empire of Japan during the Pacific campaign of World War II in the Sandakan POW Camp. By the end of the war, of all the prisoners who had been incarcerated at Sandakan and Ranau, only six Australians survived, all of whom had escaped. It is widely considered to be the single worst atrocity suffered by Australian servicemen during the Second World War. He is listed on panel 53 of the Australian War Memorial at Campbell ACT Australia

ALBERT HOWARD CLARENCE IZZARD was born in October 1894 at Kings Norton Worcestershire he was the son of John Alfred and Lizzie Izzard. He served in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers 8th Battalion his Service No 12717. He died on 7 October 1915 in the General Hospital Alexandria Egypt of Dysentry , it is possible that he had been  guarding the Suez Canal. The 8th Battalion Formed at Wrexham in August 1914. Moved to Salisbury Plain but by February 1915 was at Blackdown. He first went to the Gallipoli on 28 June 1915, Moved to Mudros in July 1915 and subsequently served in Gallipoli, Egypt and Mesopotamia. He was awarded The 1915 Star, British Medal and Victory Medal. He is buried in Alexandria (Chatby) Military and War Memorial Cemetery Grave F.33

COLIN ROY IZZARD was born in 3rd quarter of 1917 at Hitchin Hertfordshire. He married Cecilia Mahon in 2nd quarter of 1945 at Abingdon Berkshire. He was the son of Roland Izzard and Caroline Cotton. He was a Flying Officer in Bomber Command Squadron No 578, his Service No was 157641. He died 24 February 1947 in Midhurst Sussex probably as a result of injuries received while he was in service, age 29. He was in the Royal Air force Volunteers. In London Gazette 19 May 1944 he is listed as receiving DFC, and is buried at Easebourne St Mary New Churchyard     

         

Distinguished Flying Cross
The Distinguished Flying Cross (D.F.C.) was instituted on 3rd June 1918 and is a Level 3 Gallantry Award, originally for Commission Officers and Warrant Officers of the Royal Air Force. Later it was for all ranks of the Royal Navy, Royal Marines, Army, and Royal Air Force.
This distinguished awarded was presented to Colin Roy Izzard for an act or acts of valour, courage or devotion to duty whilst flying in active operations against the enemy.
The recipient, Colin Roy Izzard,as an owner of the Distinguished Flying Cross is entitled to use the letters D.F.C. after his name

From Yorkshire Evening Post 26th February 1947

IZZARD - Feb 24th after long illness at Midhurst Sussex Flight Officer Colin roy Izzard DFC beloved husband of Cecillia (Nee Mahon) Funeral Easebourne Midhurst 2pm February 27th

CYRIL BICKFORD ISARD was born 17 May 1890 at Sydenham Kent he was the son of Arthur James Isard and Emily Venning Bickford. He was training to be a Solicitor when he enlisted 24 March 1909, Service No 36535 in the 10th London Rifles he was made a Captain 5 August 1914. He first went to France on 30 July 1915. On 11 August 1915 they landed at Suvla Bay Gallipoli. He died 15 August 1915 at Suvla Bay Gallipoli aged 25. No grave has been found and he is listed on the Helles Memorial Panel 196/197.  He was awarded 1915 Star, British Medal and Victory Medal

EDGAR IZZARD was born in 3rd quarter of 1895 in Speldhurst Kent the son of Herbart Izzard and Ellen Annie M Woods. He enlisted in Queens own Royal West Kent Regiment. He died on 5 September 1916 probably at the Battle of Guillemont in the Battle of the Somme France. His Platoon Sergeant wrote a letter to his parents. He was shot by a sniper when returning from HQ where he had safely delivered a message which he had gallantly volunteered to take while a terrific bombardment was in progress. He was a very good marksman and had previously accounted for a few Germans who had been troublesome to the machine gunners. The sergeant concludes by expressing the deep sympathy of his company and adds that good men like private Izzard are difficult to replace. Still he adds it is better never to return from France than never to have come out here at all. Your son has played the part we all desire to play and I hope the mothers at home will play their part by bearing up in these trying times He was buried at Heilly Station Cemetery Mericourt-L'Abbe. He was awarded the British Meadal and Victory Medal

From Kent & Sussex Courier 22 September 1916

At the early age of 21 years Pte Edgar Izzard of 8th Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment son of Mr and Mrs Herbert Izzard of Bishops Down died in France on the 5th September from bullet wounds received in action on 1st September 1916. He was an old St Johns boy and being attested in December last was called up in January and sent to the front in June. Up to the time of enlisting in the army he was in the employ of the Farmers Supply Association

 

EDGAR IZZARD was born in 3rd quarter of 1895 at New Bilton Warwickshire he was the son of William Izzard and Harriett Duckett. He enlisted in the Rifle Brigade 1st Battalion His Service No is Z/758. He first entered France 0n 11 January 1915. He died on 13 May 1915 at Ypres Belgium probably in the Second Battle of Ypres. This Battle was known for the first use of poison gas.  He was awarded 1915 Star, British Medal and Victory Medal. No grave was found and he is listed on the Ypres Menim Gate panel 46,48 and 50

ERNEST WALTER IZZARD was born in 3rd quarter of 1886 at St Albans Hertfordshire, he was the son of James Izard and Alice Field. He enlisted in the Hertfordshire Regiment Service No 7953 then transferred to the Bedfordshire regiment No 268052. He died on 31 July 1917 and was a Corporal. Probably killed at Third Battle of Ypres or "Passchendaele. He was awarded the British Medal and Victory Medal. He has no known grave and is listed on the Ypres Menim Gate  Panel 54 and 56. His brother also died as a result of enemy action see Arthur Albert Izzard above

ERNEST IZZARD was born in 2nd quarter of 1882 at Crowborough Sussex he was the son of James Izzard and Rose Hobbs. He was married to Winifred Nye and had 2 children Prior to the war he worked for Mr J Shaw a grocer in Cliife Sussex.  He enlisted in the Sussex Regiment 2nd Battalion Service No G/4831.He first entered France on 31 May 1915. He was Killed in Action on 25 September 1915 at the The Battle of Loos this was the largest British offensive mounted on the Western Front in 1915 during World War I. The first British use of poison gas occurred and the battle was the first mass engagement of New Army units. The British offensive was part of the attempt by the French to break through the German defences in Artois and Champagne and restore a war of movement. Despite improved methods, more ammunition and better equipment the Franco-British attacks were contained by the German armies, except for local losses of ground. Casualties in the Herbstschlacht (Autumn Battle) were high on both sides. He has no grave and is listed on the Loos Memorial Panel 69 - 73.

From Sussex Agricultural Express 19th November 1915

LEWESIAN FALLS

Mrs Izzard of 7 Lancaster Place Lewes has been officially informed that her husband Private Ernest Izzard, 2nd Royal Sussex Regiment was killed in action in France as far back at September 22nd. Deceased was 33 years of age, and use to work for Mr J Shaw, grocer, Cliffe High Street. He also leaves two young children

EVA GLADYS IZZARD was born ca 1904 and was married to Leonard Lawrence Izzard. She was killed as a Civilian on 20 June 1944 in Poplar Middlesex aged 44  nothing else is known of her death. At the time of her death she was living the Wades Arms Jeremiah Street Poplar.

FRANCIS GEORGE IZZARD was born in 1st quarter of 1892 Lambeth Surrey, his parent was Harriett Izzard this was taken from CWGC website but suspect he was brought up by his grandparents. He enlisted in the Bedford Regiment 1st Battalion Service No 16506. He first entered France on 24 March 1915.   He was Killed on 21 April 1915 probably at the Battle of Ypres 1915 (also known as the Second Battle of Ypres) in April and May, where they fought at Hill 60 during the initial capture and subsequent defence that saw them lose so heavily that they were effectively rebuilt twice during the fighting. He has no known grave but is listed on Panel 31 - 33 of Ypres Menim Gate. He was awarded the 1915 Star, British Medal and Victory Medal

Ypres Menim Gate

FRANK THOMAS IZARD was born September 1890 in Aston Warwickshire he was the son of Harry Edward Izzard and Lucy Harris. Prior to joining up he worked for Birmingham Reference Library and is remembered on Old Birmingham Library War Memorial<He enlisted in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment Service No 925. He first entered France on 21 November 1915. He was Killed in Action on 4 October 1917 in Flanders Belgium. He is buried in Tyne Cot Cemetery West-Vlaanderen in Belgium. He was awarded the 1915 Star, British Medal and Victory Medal

 

 

Tyne Cot Cemetery Belgium

 

FRANCIS VALLANCE IZARD was born in 1st quarter of 1881 at Brighton Sussex. He was the son of Francis Henry Izard and Emily Beatrice Vallance. He enlisted in Royal Garrison Artillery and was a Captain. He was Killed in Action on 16 February 1915 in what became known as Indian Singapore Mutiny. He was awarded the British Star. He is buried in Kranji War Cemetery Singapore Grave No 37 F16

1915 Indian (Singapore) Mutiny

In the midst of the First World War, on 15 February 1915, the Right Wing (Rajput) of the 5th Light Infantry (Indian Army) revolted, killing more than 40 British officers, British residents and local civilians. The mutiny came to be known as the "Singapore Mutiny", and locally as the "Sepoy Mutiny" or "Indian Mutiny". But is not to be mistaken for the "Indian Mutiny 1857-1858" also known as the "Sepoy Rebellion" which occurred on Indian soil.

Background Active propaganda for Indian independence from British rule by the Ghandr Party in India during the early 1900s had generated unrest amongst overseas Indians, affecting troops stationed in Singapore. The Muslim 5th Light Infantry was one of these. The troop's morale was constantly at a low, afflicted by poor communication, slack discipline and a weak leadership. A certain Kassim Mansoor, a Gujerati Muslim coffee-shop owner, had also influenced the troops in negative feelings towards the British. The troop had been stationed to guard the military prisoners from the German ship, Emden, at the Alexandra Barracks. Their duties at an end, they were slated to leave for Hong Kong by 16 February 1915. However, rumours amongst the troop had it that they were to be ferried to fight against Muslim Turkey instead. The misunderstanding led to greater disaffection which was fanned further by the German prisoner, Oberleutenant Lauterbach, who encouraged the troop to mutiny against their British commanders.

Description With a single rifle shot soon after 3 pm by Sepoy Ismail Khan signalled the start of the mutiny. Being the middle of the Chinese New Year, the majority of the Chinese Volunteers were on leave, leaving Singapore almost defenceless in the face of the Indian mutiny. Officers at the Tanglin barracks were massacred. An estimated 800 mutineers roamed the streets of Singapore, killing any Europeans they came across. However, without strong leadership and with their German supporters having escaped, the mutiny soon lost direction. It however continued for ten days and was not suppressed until support came from the Singapore Volunteer Artillery, additional British troopers, military men brought in by the Sultan of Johor and men from the Allied forces including Japan.

A Court of Inquiry was held on 23 February 1915, first in secret but then continued publicly, concluded by 15 May. A total of 36 mutineers were executed, including Kassim Mansoor, and 77 officers were transported with another 12 imprisoned. The public executions were conducted at Outram Prison, witnessed by an estimated 15,000.

Impact

Subsequently, all Indian residents were required to register, causing ill feelings amongst a majority loyal community. Studies more than half a century after the event imply that the mutiny may have had strong support from factions based in India, keen on overthrowing British forces in the region. It also serves as a reminder of the importance of internal security and the need for a civilian force trained in defence. To commemorate the event, two memorial tablets have been placed at the entrance of the Victoria Memorial Hall and four plaques at the St Andrew's Cathedral.

 

Royal Artillery Memorial - Picture of St Andrew's Cathedral, Singapore
This photo of St Andrew's Cathedral is courtesy of TripAdvisor

 

FREDERICK THOMAS IZZARD was born in 3rd quarter of 1898 at Wheathampstead Hertfordshire he was the son of Thomas Izzard and Ada Lines. He enlisted in the Norfolk Regiment 1st Battalion Service No 26330. He died 29 September 1918 probably at the fifth battle of Ypres. He has no know grave but is listed on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial Pas De Calais France. He was awarded the British and Victory Medals

FREDERICK CHARLES IZZARD was born in January 1892 at Uckfield Sussex. He was the son of Frederick Charles Izzard and Deborah Maria Symonds. Brother of Mrs C Billett. He enlisted in the London Regiment Royal Fusiliers 2nd Battalion Service No 92861. He died on 10 September 1918 on the Somme France. He is buried in Grave 7 L6 at London Cemetery and Extension Longueval. He awarded The 1915 Star, British Medal and Victory Medal 

From Sussex Agriculteral Express 4 October 1918

Mr and Mrs F C Izzard of 5 North Road Uckfield have received the sad news that their second son Private F C Izzard of the Royal Fusiliers was killed in action on 10 September 1918 whilst serving with his London Regiment to which he had been posted, only two days before he wrote to his fiancé saying that he was for 'over the top' and this was his last letter. He was 26 years of age and had served four years in the Army as he and both of his two brothers joined up voluntarily at the commencement of the war and went almost immediately to France. Where he served continuously and without mishap. It is a year since he was home and he had but 15 days leave during the whole of his service. A Baker by trade he was formerly in the employ of Mr Whiteside at Uckfield but at the time of enlisting was working in Brighton of his other brothers Driver Charles Izzard is with the the mechanical transport in France and Private Frank Izzard of the machine gun corps is at a convalescence camp in England recovering from wounds and gas received last March

 

FREDERICK CHARLES IZZARD was born in last quarter of 1897 at Little Horsted Sussex.  He was the son of George Thomas Izzard and Dorcas Briggs. He enlisted in the Merchant Navy and was a cook, at the time of his death he was serving on the Empire Tiger , which was lost in a storm en route from Philadelphia and Halifax, Nova Scotia, bound for the Clyde, a distress call was received on 27 February 1941 but no trace was found and it sank in the Atlantic Ocean. He is listed on panel 46 of the Tower Hill Memorial London

From List of Empire ships (Th–Ty)

Empire Tiger

Empire Tiger was a 4,886 GRT cargo ship which was built by Todd Drydock & Construction Corp, Tacoma, Washington. Completed in 1919 as Orcus for USSB. Sold in 1923 to Grace Steamship Company, New York and renamed Coya. To MoWT in 1940 and renamed Empire Tiger. Last reported on 27 February 1941 in the Atlantic bound for the Clyde.

GEORGE ALFRED ISARD was born 26 August 1888 at Paddington Middlesex to George Isard and Martha Ann Cuff. He enlisted in 2nd Battalion Queens Westminster's Rifles. Service No 55448. He died in Honfleur Hospital of Pneumonia on 2 November 1918 and is buried Ste Marie Cemetery Le Havre France.  He was awarded the British Medal and Victory Medal. His brother Thomas Harold was also killed in action see below

EXTRACT FROM RECORDS OF THE CALENDER YEAR 1918(Written in French)

On the 2nd November 1918 at 12.15pm the soldier G.A.Isard from the London Troop aged 30, religion Church of England died at the hospital of Honfleur. The death has been declared on 4th November 1918 at 10.30am by the soldier J.E.Kichener and by Charles Pelfrene, secretary of the Mayor aged 58, living 38865, route Natinale in Graville Ste Honorine, who after reading, signed with us. Prudence Duclos in charge of the record

 

 

GEORGE EDWARD IZARD was born on 1st April 1896 at Evandale Tasmania Australia the son of George Charles Izard and Clara Langley. He enlisted in the Australian Infantry AIF 52nd Battalion. Service No 4519. He died on 25th August 1917, from wounds aged 21 at the Australian Casualty Clearing Station in the north of France in WW1. He is buried in grave I Y2 Trois Arbres Cemetery Steenwerck France. He is listed on panel 155 of the Australian War Memorial at Campbell ACT Australia

GEORGE HENRY IZARD was born 1st quarter of 1884 at Pancras Middlesex London he was the son of Edward Izard and Louisa Vaughan. He enlisted in the Norfolk Regiment 7th Battalion and was a lieutenant. He transferred to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. He first entered service in Egypt 24 April 1915. He was killed on 10 August 1918 probably at the Battle of Amiens. He is buried in Grave I E5 in Ribecourt British Cemetery Cambrai France. Unfortunately he is not listed in the World War One medal roll. 

GEORGE WALTER IZZARD was born 2nd quarter of 1923 at Edmonton Middlesex his parents are listed as Mr & Mrs G W Izzard although I suspect this to be Mr W Izzard & Mrs Izzard. He enlisted in the Middlesex Regiment 70th Battalion and was killed in Action 29 July 1942. Probably died in England as he listed as being buried at Tottenham Cemetery Grave No 42. Have found it very difficult to find out about him if anyone can add any info it would be appreciated

GEORGE ISZARD was born in 1st quarter of 1918 in Hackney. He was the son of Joseph and Emily Iszard.He enlisted in the Middlesex Regiment 1st battalion. Service No 5335415. He was killed on 1st October 1942, in Hong Kong, but according to the World War 2 Roll of honours George was aboard the ship SS Lisbon Marua. He has no known grave. He is listed on Panel 14 of the Sai Wan Memorial in Hong Kong

SS LISBON MARU

On October 1st 1942, the American submarine Grouper fired six torpedoes at a Japanese troop transport, the Lisbon Maru, off Shanghai. Five of the unreliable Mk 14 fish either passed under the target or failed to detonate, but one exploded against the stern, bringing the ship to a standstill. Grouper immediately came under attack from patrol boats and aircraft, and departed the scene, taking one last look at 700 Japanese soldiers being taken off the stricken vessel.

What they didn't see, however, was that the soldiers had battened down the hatches over the holds as they left. In those holds, trapped and waiting to drown in appalling conditions of filth, disease, and malnutrition were over 1,800 British Prisoners of War who had been captured at the fall of Hong Kong nine months earlier.

None need have died, but only 748 returned to Britain alive. This is the story of the ship, the submarine, and the men.

GEORGE IZZARD was born in 1878 in Horsley Surrey he was the son of Henry Izzard and Charlotte Walter. He married Charlotte Ella Walter in 1910 and had 4 children. George enlisted in the Royal Fusiliers. Service No 40814. and was killed in action probably at the Battle of the Somme on 5 August 1916. He is buried in grave J22 at the Dernacourt Communal Cemetery France. He was awarded the British Medal and Victory Medal. His Brother Albert Allan was also Killed in Action in 1915. His name is listed on a memorial tablet in Holy Trinity Church and a Memorial Cross in The Churchyard facing The South Downs.

FROM SURREY ADVERTISER 4 SEPTEMBER 1916

EAST HORSLEY TWO SONS KILLED

Mr and Mrs H Izzard of Norrells Lodge East Horsley, have received the sad news that their eldest son. Pte G Izzard of the Royal Fusiliers has been killed. He leaves a widow who lives at Cuckfield Sussex and three children. Deceased who was 38 years of age joined up in his group in June last went to the the front on July 11th and died of wounds on August 5th - two months after joining. Mr and Mrs Izzard lost another son in June last year. They have three more sons serving and a son in law

HENRY GEORGE IZARD was born in last quarter of 1895 at Poplar Middlesex. He was the son of George Henry Izard and Emma Monk. He enlisted at Canning town in the London Regiment (City of London Rifles), Service No 348085. When he  died on 9 July 1918 in Flanders France he was a Lance Corporal.  He is buried in Grave ix A 23 at Contay British Cemetery  Contay France. He was awarded British Medal and Victory Medal.

HENRY GEORGE IZZARD was born 3rd quarter of 1892 at West Ham. He was in the printing trade before enlisting at Stratford in the Royal Garrison Artillery as a Gunner, Service No 38763. He first entered the war in France on the 14 October 1914. He was killed in Action in Flanders France on 3 December 1916 Arras. He is buried in Grave IJ60 at Faubourg D'Amiens Cemetery Arras. He was awarded the 1914 Star, British Medal and Victory Medal. I have been unable to find out who his parents were any assistance on this would be appreciated

HORACE IZZARD  was born in 2nd quarter of 1898 at Wheathampstead Hertfordshire. His parents were Robert Izzard and Julia Bozier. He enlisted at Hertford in the Duke of Wellingtons (West Rding Regiment) Service No 203350. He died of his wounds on 6 September 1918 at Rouen in France. He is buried in Grave Q iv G 17 at St Sever Cemetery Extension Rouen France. He received the British Medal and Victory Medal. His name is listed on Wheathampstead War Memorial.

HENRY IZZARD was 2 July 1881 at Chobham Surrey he was the son of William Izzard and Martha Hawthorn. He married Alice Edith Rose Evans in the last quarter of 1907 at Chertsey Surrey. He enlisted in the Dorsetshire Regiment 6th Battalion at Weybridge Surrey at the time he was a Jobbing Gardener.. He was killed in action on 11 October 1918 Monray in Flanders France. He was buried at Montay Neuvilly Cemetery Montay in grave I E2. He was awarded the British Medal and the Victory Medal

HARRY IZZARD was born in Horley Surrey on 16 November 1894, he was the son of Henry and Louise Izzard. He enlisted at Eastbourne into the Middlesex Regiment Service No 6695. He died on 22 April 1916 at Cambridge and was buried in Cambridge City Cemetery. He is not listed on the Medal Roll so he might not have seen any service when he died. this turned out to be the case, Harry was found dead in the River Granta Cambridgeshire. After an inquest nothing could be found and the verdict was found drowned.

From Surrey Mirror 5th May 1916

SINGULAR INQUEST STORY AT CAMBRIDGE

A singular story of a Derby recruit's strange adventures and mysterious disappearance was unfolded at an adjourned inquest at the Cambridge Borough Coroner's Court on Saturday last upon the body of a soldier, which was found in the river Granta the previous Saturday morning. The body, which had been in the water three weeks or more, was found by by Acting-Sergt Witham of the Borough Police, floating in the water close to a punt which had been placed against the sluice gates where the Granta falls into the Cam. Evidence was given which left no doubt that the body was that of Pte Harry Izzard, belonging to a Territorial battalion of the Middlesex Regiment which was recently quarted in Cambridge

A FORMER REDHILL RESIDENT

Henry Izzard of 49 South Street Lewes Sussex stated that his son Harry aged 21 last November was born at White Hughes Horley and was about 5ft 10ins in height, with darkish hair and slight moustache. Witness until recently lived at Redhill, and it was there that he last saw Harry about seven or eight weeks ago. Harry left him and went to his sister at 10 Spring Terrace Old Town Eastbourne, and witness had a letter back in about three weeks time to say that he had enlisted. His civilian clothes were returned with a line: "Goodbye God bless you I’m off to Cambridge." Witness then wrote to Cambridge to the battalion there but the letter was returned to his daughter at Eastbourne together with an intimation that Harry was missing. A detective, also came and said the lad had deserted.

Witness in reply to questions said Harry was brought up as a farm labourer. Witness could not understand how it had happened, but his son must have missed his party from Chichester, come by another route, and had been knocking about Cambridge and it had preyed on his mind. He enlisted at Chichester, He was a good living fellow, a good scholar and not in the least likely to attempt his own life. Witness thought he must have fallen into the river or been pushed in. He had never known him to drink a pint of beer in a month. "When i heard of it, it nearly broke my heart" added the old man. "He knew how to behave himself in any company" Asked if his son took any interest in sport, the father replied " No all his mind was on going to the pictures every night. That’s where he spent his ha'pence". In further replies witness said he had never heard that his son was in any trouble or was keeping company with anybody

THE FATHER'S BELIEF

"Did he like soldiering" asked a juror. "No he didn’t like soldiering and didn’t care about going for a soldier" replied the witness, "but i told him he would have to go and he had better go at once. So he went away to his sister, and she had a letter back that he had enlisted. Up to that time he seemed cheerful and all right, and i saw no difference in him from anybody else", "He was always all right enough for me." added the father, in reply to another query. "It was the last thing I should have thought he would have done. I should think it was accidental or someone had knocked him about.

Captain F. L. Feltham produced the official papers relating to Harry Izzard. The yellow Army Form, signed by the recruiting Officer at Eastbourne, calling Harry Izzard up was addressed to 10 Spring Terrace Old Town Eastbourne and warned him to join the colours on March 13th. The attestation form was made out in the name of Henry Izzard evidently a mistake-and the recruit had signed himself Henry Izzard, as he would have to do. His age was stated as 21 years119 days and his occupation as agricultural labourer.

Mr. Izzard: that’s my boy right enough. Captain Feltham added that the attestation papers under " choice of regiment" was filled in "Royal Sussex Regiment" Mr. Izzard: that’s right, I told him so to join the Royal Sussex

Proceeding Captain Feltham said the recruit was posted to the Middlesex Regiment. His birthplace was put down as Horley

Mr. Izzard: Yes that’s my boy

DECEASED CHIEF TROUBLE

Witness resuming said that the battalion when at Cambridge had a considerable number of Derby recruits reporting from all over the country. Izzard reported himself at the orderly room in De-Freville avenue about 10pm on March 15th, he was in plain clothes. Witness was called to see him as he had come unofficially, without his party, and a billet was found for him for the night. He said he had been called to the Chichester depot, and had to travel with a party of recruits from Chichester to Ealing Middlesex where the administrative centre of the battalion was situated, to be checked clothed, and then sent on with the same party to Cambridge. Witness saw him again next morning, and had a quarter of an hour's chat with him. From his demeanor he seemed to think that he would get into serious trouble in not going across London with his party. He lost himself and asked the way to Liverpool-Street, and paid his fare from there to Cambridge. Witness cheered him up and told him there would be no trouble, that it was strange to him at first, but that he would soon make a soldier, and that his friends in the party would soon arrive. That seemed to cheer him up. He was fitted out with uniform. That night he was reported missing. They notified the police thinking he had lost himself and would turn up eventually. Next morning they heard that the police had found him, and a man was sent to fetch him, but as he was not under arrest, there being no charge against him, in the meantime he disappeared again. His chief trouble had seemed to be the fear of getting into trouble for missing his party and not going to Ealing. He also told witness that he suffered from loss of memory at times. He was with the battalion practically only one day.

Replying to a juror, witness said the man's party turned a day or two later, Izzard did not strike him as being a melancholy man. Witness thought he was shy.

Major H.B. Roderick stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body, the appearance of which was compatible with its having been in the water since the day he was missed. There was no definite marks of violence and no evidence of ante-mortem violence. He must have into the water alive, and there was no evidence to show there had been any fowl play

AN OPEN VERDICT

PC Barker said that about 11.55pm on the 17th March he answered a ring at the front door of the Cambridge Police station and saw a soldier in uniform who said his name was Izzard, and that he belonged to the Middlesex Regiment, and had just previously been sitting on Parker's Piece and not feeling well. An officer spoke to him and advised him to go to the police-station. He was accordingly allowed to sleep at the police-station that night

By the Chief Constable (Mr. C.E. Holland: There was no charge against him and they took him in out of charity. PC Sharman said that about 8am on the 18th March he was told to give Izzard some breakfast, and did so. Witness was informed that the orderly room had been notified, and that a sergeant would call for Izzard about 10am. There was no charge against Izzard and witness did not take any particular notice of him. He thanked witness for the breakfast and witness left him to eat it, and he was not a prisoner did not lock the door. When the sergeant came at 10am Izzard was gone and could not be found. Witness had not noticed anything unusual about him.

A verdict of "Found drowned" was returned there being no evidence to show how the body got into the river.

Captain Feltham on behalf of the officers, N.C.O.'s and men of the battalion expressed their deep sympathy with the relatives.

 

HARRY CHARLES IZZARD was born in last quarter of 1912 at Royston Hertfordshire he was the son of Walter John Izzard and Ada Maud Skeggs. He was married to Mary Hilda Annie Earle at Alton Hampshire in the last quarter of 1932. He had four children the youngest was born after he died. He enlisted into the Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Regiment as an infantryman and ended as a Lance Corporal. He was killed on either 1st or 2nd June 1940 at the evacuation of Dunkirk France. He has no grave but is listed on the Dunkirk Memorial

Panel 48 Dunkirk Memorial

HARRY HARLAND ISARD/LAMB was born 5 May 1892 in Fulham Middlesex he was the son of James Linn Isard and Beatrice Jenny Harland. The parents split up sometime before 1900 and he took the name of his stepfather Edward J Lamb. He attended the private Sydenham School. He worked for the Croydon Gas Company. He enlisted in the London Rifles Brigade Service No 1065. He first went to France on 28 March 1915.He was killed on 2 May 1915 during the 2nd battle of Ypres in Belgium. He has no grave and is listed on 3 memorials. The Menin Gate panel 52 - 54, The Croydon Gas Company Memorial and St Augustine's Church Memorial at Grove Park. He was awarded the 1915 Star, British Medal and Victory Medal

HARRY HOWARD IZZARD was born in 3rd quarter of 1884 in Penshurst Kent he was the son of Thomas Izzard and Elizabeth Laxby. He enlisted in the Queens Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) at Tonbridge.Service Battalion 1/4 No 200587. At the time of his death he was a Sergeant. He died of wounds received on 29 December 1917 in India. Most of the Territorial battalions in this Battalion spent the war on garrison duty, particularly in India and Egypt, relieving the Regular battalions for front-line service. He was buried in Plot CE/5 Row M Grave 70 at Jubbulpore Cantonment Cemetery in Mumbai India. He is listed on two War Memorial the Kirkee 1914 - 1918 War Memorial in Mumbai and in Penshurst Parish Church Kent. He was awarded the British Star medal

St Johns Parish Church Penshurst Kent

HARRY ISEARD was born on 21st October 1892 at Crouch End London, He was the son of Charles Iseard and Annie Cowtan. He enlisted in the London Regiment (London Irish Regiment) Service No 2266 and was a Lance Corporal at the time of his death. He was Killed in Action on 25 September 1915 at the The Battle of Loos this was the largest British offensive mounted on the Western Front in 1915 during World War I. The first British use of poison gas occurred and the battle was the first mass engagement of New Army units. The British offensive was part of the attempt by the French to break through the German defences in Artois and Champagne and restore a war of movement. Despite improved methods, more ammunition and better equipment the Franco-British attacks were contained by the German armies, except for local losses of ground. Casualties in the Herbstschlacht (Autumn Battle) were high on both sides. He has no grave and is listed on the Loos Memorial Panel 133. He was awarded the 1915 Star, British Medal and Victory Medal

HARRY ERNEST IZZARD was born in 1st quarter of 1900 at Chiswick in Middlesex. He was the son of Albert Henry Izzard (Deceased 1905) and Florence Eliza Fance (remarried to Richard Warren 1909). He enlisted in the Northumberland Fusiliers at Bristol Service No TR/5/13042. He died while in a Military Hospital at Clipstone Camp Nottingham on 20th April 1918.while in the training Reserve. He is buried at Clandown Holy Trinity Churchyard in Somerset (strange that he was buried in Somerset). His brother Herbert Cecil Ernest Izzard was also Killed in Action See below

HENRY WALTER IZZARD was born in 3rd quarter of 1880 in Hitchin Hertfordshire. He was the son of Henry Izzard and Elizabeth Day. He was married to Ellen Catherine Grosvenor in Hitchin in 1900. He was a Engineman in Royal Navy Reserves and at the time of his death on 17th December 1918, was serving on HMS Pavlova a Trawler Minesweeper. His official No was 623.T.S.(Ch), and he died from a disease in Grimsby Lincolnshire. and is buried in Grave 43C 14 Scartho Road Cemetery Grimsby Lincolnshire 

 

HERBERT CECIL ERNEST IZZARD was born in Chiswick ion 5th April 1894. He was the son of Albert Henry Izzard (Deceased 1905) and Florence Eliza Fance (remarried to Richard Warren 1909). He married Maud Mary Evelyn Woodage at Chiswick in March 1915 but she died in December 1918. He enlisted at Bow Essex as a Rifleman in the 17th Battalion London Regiment Service No 4442, he first went to France 9 October 1915. He was Killed in Action on 19 April 1916 in Flanders. He was awarded 1915 Star. British Medal and Victory Medal. His brother Harry Ernest Izzard was also Killed in Action See above

HERBERT RICHARD IZZARD was born in 2nd quarter of 1881 at Weedon Bec Northamptonshire. He was the son of Samuel Izzard and Ann Weston. He enlisted in the Duke of Edinburgh Wiltshire Regiment 7th Battalion at Northampton, Service No 32352. He was Killed in Action on 24th April 1917, at the The Battle of Doiran Salonika Greece. No body was found and he is listed on the Doiran Memorial. He was awarded the British Medal and Victory Medal.

The Battle of Doiran Wiltshire Regiment 7th (Service) Battalion  formed at the Wiltshire Regiment's depot in Devizes in September 1914, the 7th Battalion was part of the Third New Army (or K3) of Kitchener's scheme. Soon after formation, the battalion became part of the 79th Infantry Brigade, assigned to the 26th Division. In September 1915, the division was transferred to France before being reassigned to the Mediterranean as part of the British forces fighting in Salonika. As part of the division, the battalion was engaged in The Battle of Horseshoe Hill in 1916, and First and Second Battles of Dorian in 1916 and 1917.

HENRY HERMAN IZZARD was born 2nd quarter of 1895 at Wormsley Herefordshire. He was the son of Charles (Deceased 1902) and Elizabeth Izzard. He joined the Hereford Regiment Service No 235544. He first entered action in the Balkans on 9 August 1915.  He was killed in action at the First Battle of Gaza on 26 March 1917. He has no known grave and is listed on the Jerusalem Memorial. He was awarded the 1915 Star, British Medal and Victory Medal.

The Battle of Gaza was fought on 26 March 1917 during the first attempt by the Egyptian Expeditionary Force (EEF) to invade the southern region of Palestine in the Ottoman Empire during the Sinai and Palestine Campaign of the First World War. Fighting took place in and around the town of Gaza on the Mediterranean coast when the infantry and mounted infantry in the Desert Column, a component of Eastern Force attacked the town. Late in the afternoon, on the verge of capturing Gaza, the Desert Column was withdrawn amid concerns for approaching darkness and large Ottoman reinforcements. This British defeat was followed a few weeks later by the even more emphatic defeat of the Eastern Force component of the EEF, at the Second Battle of Gaza in April 1917.

HORACE HENRY IZZARD was born in 3rd quarter of 1897 at Weedon Northamptonshire. He was the son of Albert Izzard and Lucy Clarke. He enlisted into the Middlesex Regiment 26th Battalion Service No G/51446 He died after the war had ended on the 21 February 1919 at Bury Lancashire. He was buried at Weedon Bec Cemetery Northamptonshire Grave 18. He was awarded the British Medal and the Victory Medal

HUBERT EDGAR ISARD was born in 1st quarter of 1920 in Croydon. He was the son of Charles Walter Isard and Rosa Laurette Hammond. He married Ida Mary Cooke in Whitby Yorkshire in the 1st quarter of 1944. He enlisted into the Rifle Brigade. At the time of his death he was in the 2nd Battalion Service No 6970396 and was a Corporal. He was killed on 19 July 1944 and is buried in Ranville War Cemetery Plot 2 Row b Grave 133.. Ranville was the first village to be liberated in France when the bridge over the Caen Canal was captured intact in the early hours of 6 June by troops of the 6th Airborne Division, who were landed nearby by parachute and glider. From Victory in Europe by Julian Thompson written for the Imperial War Musuem He was probably killed at the beginning of the big breakout from Normandy. Criticism was being heaped on Montgomery by Eisenhower and SHAPE , at his failure to breakout. It was called Operation Goodwood and Hubert was killed on the 2nd day of the offensive probably at a place called Bourguebus Ridge Nr Falaise in France

JOHN FRANCIS IZARD was born in Mildura Victoria Australia in 1909. He was the son of Arthur John Izard and Elizabeth Shephenson. He enlisted in the Royal Australian Artillery AIF unit 17 Anti Tank Battery. He was killed on 1 July 1942 in the South China Sea. He was aboard the ship SS Montevidea Maru as a Prisoner of War

SINKING OF SS MONTEVIDEO MARU

On 22 June 1942, some weeks after the fall of Rabaul to the Japanese, a large number of Australian prisoners were embarked from Rabaul's port on the SS Montevideo Maru. Unmarked as a POW ship, she was proceeding without escort to the Chinese island of Hainan, when she was sighted by the American submarine USS Sturgeon near the northern Philippine coast on 30 June.

The Sturgeon pursued, but was unable to fire, as the target was traveling at 17 knots. However, it slowed to about 12 knots at midnight; according to crewman Yoshiaki Yamaji, it was to rendezvous with an escort of two destroyers. Unaware that it was carrying Allied prisoners of war and civilians, the Sturgeon fired four torpedoes at the Montevideo Maru before dawn of 1 July, causing the vessel to sink in only 11 minutes. According to Yamaji, Australians in the water sang "Auld Lang Syne" to their trapped mates as the ship sank beneath the waves.

There were more POWs in the water than crew members. The POWs were holding pieces of wood and using bigger pieces as rafts. They were in groups of 20 to 30 people, probably 100 people in all. They were singing songs. I was particularly impressed when they began singing Auld Lang Syne as a tribute to their dead colleagues. Watching that, I learnt that Australians have big hearts.

Eyewitness Yoshiaki Yamaji, interviewed Oct. 2003

The sinking is considered the worst maritime disaster in Australia's history. A nominal list made available by the Japanese government in 2012 revealed that a total of 1054 prisoners (178 non-commissioned officers, 667 soldiers and 209 civilians) died on the Montevideo Maru. Of the ship's total complement, approximately twenty Japanese crew survived, out of an original 88 guards and crew.

Among the missing prisoners was Reverend Syd Beazley of the Methodist Mission, the uncle of former Australian Labour Party opposition leader Kim Beazley. Another was Tom Vernon Garrett, the grandfather of former Midnight Oil lead singer and former Australian Minister for School Education, Early Childhood and Youth, Peter Garrett. Another individual, Richard Kingsmill Pennefather Moore, had served in the Imperial Camel Corps as a Lieutenant and was awarded a Military Cross. His son, William Richard Moore, married Nora Wish Garrett, aunt of Peter Garrett. Also amongst those lost were 22 Salvation Army bandsmen, the majority being members of the Brunswick Citadel band. The bandsmen had enlisted together and comprised the majority of the band of the 2/22nd Battalion

He is listed on the Rabaul Memorial in Papua New Guinea

JOHN FREDERICK IZZARD was born in Crowborough Sussex in 1887. He was the son of Alfred Albert Izzard and Harriett Ovenden.  On 12th March 1910 he married Lizzie Sheppard at All Saints Church Crowborough Sussex, they had two children both boys.  He enlisted in the Royal Fusiliers at Chichester his Service No was 51303.He was killed in action on 30 December 1917 in Flanders France, at the time of his death he was a Lance Corporal. He has no grave and is listed on the Thiepval Memorial. He was awarded the British Medal and Victory Medal.

Thiepval Memorial

JOHN HENRY IZZARD was born on 10th January 1924 at Flitwick Bedfordsahire. John was the son of Frederick William Izzard and Annie Lily Law. He enlisted into the Navy Service No P/JX327941. He was killed on 27 August 1943 aboard the ship HMS Egret. He has no grave but is listed on the Navy Memorial at Portsmouth Southsea Common. His brother Cecil William Izzard was also killed in World War Two See above. His name is listed on Flitwick War Memorial.

Panel 75 Navy Memorial at Portsmouth Southsea Common

HMS Egret  was a sloop of the British Royal Navy, the lead ship of her class. She was built by J. Samuel White at Cowes, Isle of Wight and was launched on 31 May 1938.

Egret was the first ship ever to be sunk by a guided missile. The Germans had used the Henschel Hs 293 glider bomb for the first time on 25 August 1943 against the 40th Support Group in the Bay of Biscay. Landguard was slightly damaged by a near miss. Bideford was hit and damaged, with one sailor killed, though more serious damage was avoided because the bomb's explosive charge did not fully detonate.

On 27 August 1943 the 40th Support Group was relieved by the 1st Support Group, consisting of Egret together with the sloop Pelican and the frigates Jed, Rother, Spey and Evenlode. The group was attacked by a squadron of 18 Dornier Do 217 carrying Henschel glider bombs. One of the two covering destroyer HMCS Athabaskan was heavily damaged by a bomb and Egret was sunk with the loss of 194 of her crew. At the time there were four RAF Y-Service electronics specialists on board, all of whom also died in the attack, thus bringing to total killed to 198. (These four RAF personnel are typically excluded from published casualty figures.) Egret had been fitted with electronic surveillance equipment designed to monitor Luftwaffe bomber communications and these Y-Service technicians were aboard to operate this equipment. The other destroyer HMS Grenville commanded by Roger Hill was attacked by the Dorniers firing one missile at a time but survived by being able out-turn the bomb.

JOHN LAURENCE IZZARD was born in 3rd quarter of 1905 at Rochford in Essex. He was the son of Arthur James Izzard and Ethel May Clarke. At the time of his death on 26 April 1943 Sri Lanka buried at Trincomalee Cemetery. He was listed as a Lieutenant on the General list . I no very little about him if anyone can help please contact me

The General List acts as a holding unit for specialist officers (usually reservists) who have not yet been assigned to a unit.

JOHN WILLIAM IZARD was born in Ifield Sussex in 1st quarter of 1897. He was the son of Joseph Izard and Ellen J Court. He enlisted in the Royal Sussex Regiment 4th Battalion at Horsham Service No TF/201157. He was killed in action on 26 March 1917 at The Battle of Gaza. He has no known grave but is commemorated on Panel 26 & 27 Jerusalem Memorial Israel. He was awarded the British Medal and Victory Medal. He is listed on Ifield Sussex Roll of Honour

 

LAWRENCE THEODORE IZZARD  was born in Ontario Canada on 1st February 1916. His parents were Herbert Percy Izzard ad Vera Louise Kuhl. He was flying officer in the Royal Canadian Air Force Squadron No 149, his Service No is J/7462. He was shot down and killed over the Baltic Sea on 8th December 1942. He is commemorated on the Runnymede Air Force Memorial Panl 99

Runnymede Air Force Memorial Panel 99

LAURENCE IZARD was born in 1895 in Moyhu Victoria Australia. His parents were Richard William Izard and Evelyn Mary Lawrence. He enlisted in the 7th Battalion Australian Infantry Forces. He was killed on 20th August 1916, in action at the Somme France. He is listed on Villers Bretonneux Australian National Memorial

VILLERS-BRETONNEUX MEMORIAL

 

 

From Wangaratte Chronicle 14th October 196

BOMBER LAURENCE IZARD,

Mr, and Mrs 'William Izard, of Whitfield Wednesday received word from the Defence Department that their son Bomber Laurence William Izard had been killed in action in France. Sympathy of the King, Queen and Commonwealth was conveyed to the parents in their loss.

Mr. Izard received information on 25th September that his son, had been missing since 20th August, but no further information was forth coming until word of his death was received on Wednesday. The late Bomber Izard was 21 years 'of age last June, and was the eldest son, he enlisted a little over 12 months ago, and had been fighting in France for several months, He was a quiet manly young fellow, and was well liked, For 15 months he attended the Agricultural High School at Wangaratta, where he was popular with staff and students. He was the oldest of a family of nine, six brothers and, two sisters living at Whitfield with their parents

 

MARTIN JAMES IZZARD was born in 1st quarter of 1896 at Kingston Surrey. He was the son of James Peak Izzard and Amy Rachel Summers. He enlisted into the Hertfordshire Regiment 1st Battalion. Service No 265681 and first went to France on 21 January 1915. He was killed on 2 August 1917 probably at the 3rd Battle of Ypres. He is buried at Harlebeke New British Cemetery. He was awarded 1915 Star, British Medal and Victory Medal.

From Hertford Mercury and Reformer  17th November 1917

LETCHWORTH

After a long interval of silence official news has come through to Mr. and Mrs. Izzard 12 Glebe Road Letchworth of the death of their son Pte. Martin Izzard, Herts. Regiment who was taken prisoner after St. Julien suffering from a gunshot wound in one of his lungs from which he succumbed a few days later. Pte. Izzard was employed by Messrs. J. T. Openshaw and Co, who have now lost four men: Sergt. Hughes, Pte. Harry Bland, DCM amd Pte. E Burke

Third Battle of Ypres

The battalion spent the first half of 1917 holding the line near Ypres. In July it began training for its next major action, the Third Battle of Ypres. On the opening day, 31 July 1917, 39th Division mounted an advance towards Pilckem Ridge. The 1/1st Hertfordshires were employed in the third phase of the operation. Advancing over the Steenbeek towards the Langemarck Line, the battalion suffered increasingly heavy casualties from enemy machine-gun fire. On reaching the enemy wire it was found to have been undamaged by the artillery bombardment and the battalion was forced to fall back under heavy fire and strong German counterattacks. Every officer was a casualty, eleven of whom including the commanding officer were killed, while the other ranks suffered 459 casualties. Subsequently, Lieutenant Colonel Phillips took command and drafts of men were received to rebuild the battalion. During the remaining months of the year it continued to play a peripheral role in the fighting at Ypres

OLIVER GEORGE IZZARD  was born on 18 October 1880 at Guilden Morden Cambridgeshire. He was the son of Samuel Izzard and Martha Brockett (Deceased 1888). He married Kate Dellar at Guilden Morden on 7 August 1905. He had at least one child. He enlisted in the Dorsetshire Regiment in Aldershot Surrey 7th Battalion Service No 8/8441. He died on 24 December 1916 at the Red Cross Hospital Exmouth, St Thomas Devon and is buried in Guilden Morden Cemetery Cambridgeshire. He has no medals listed in the Medal Roll

Headstone Guilden Morden Cemetery

PERCY IZZARD was born in 1895 in Haringey Middlesex he was the son of Arthur Izzard and Ada Wright. He enlisted in London to the London Regiment 8th Battalion (Post Office Rifles). He was killed in action on 30 March 1917. He is listed as dying in Flanders, but is buried in Bedford Town Cemetery. Was he injured and brought home and then died, if anyone knows please contact me. He awarded the British Medal and Victory Medal

PERCIVAL CHARLES IZZARD was born in 2nd quarter of 1876 in Stepney Essex. He was the son of Thomas Izzard and Sarah Ann Catchpole. He enlisted in the Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment) C Company 3rd/8th Battalion Service No 5278. He transferred to the Labour Corps Service No 403163. He died on 4 February 1919 probably as a result of injuries received. He is buried at Colchester Cemetery Essex.

PERCY JOHN ISARD was born in 3rd quarter of 1893 at Newick in Sussex. He was the son Stephen Isard and Ellen Matilda Selsby. He enlisted into the Sussex Regiment13th Battalion at Lewes Sussex Service No SD/2940. He was killed in action on 30 June 1916 at the Battle of Boars Head often referred to as the day Sussex died. He is buried at Cabaret Rouge Cemetery Souchez France Grave No XV N 32. He is listed on War Memorial in Newick Church Newick Sussex. He was awarded the British Medal and Victory Medal

Battle of the Boar's Head

At Richebourg, in 1916, the 11th, 12th and 13th (Southdowns) Battalions of the Royal Sussex, made up the 116th Southdowns Brigade of the 39th Division in Kitchener's New Army. On 30 June 1916 they took part in the Battle of the Boar's Head, Richebourg L'Avoue. After a bombardment of the German trenches the 12th and 13th Battalions went over the top (most for the first time) and, under heavy fire, attacked the enemy trenches, bombing and bayoneting their way in. The 11th Battalion supplied carrying parties. They succeeded in taking the German front line trench, holding it for some four hours, and even briefly took the second line trench for about half an hour, beating off repeated counterattacks, and only withdrew from the shortage of ammunition and mounting casualties. Over a period of less than five hours the three Southdowns Battalions of The Royal Sussex lost 17 officers and 349 men killed, including 12 sets of brothers, of whom three were from one family. A further 1000 men were wounded or taken prisoner. In regimental history this is known as The Day Sussex Died. The following day the Battle of the Somme began and 20,000 died on the first day. The Royal Sussex attack at Richebourg was just a diversion, not even considered a separate action in the history of the war, and remains largely unmentioned in any of the official histories.

PERCY IZZARD was born in 1st quarter of 1893 at St Albans Hertfordshire, he was the son of James Izzard and Alice Field. He enlisted at St Albans into the Hertfordshire Regiment Service No 2010 and first saw service in France on 6 November 14. He was killed in action on 13 November 1916 probably at the Battle of Ancre. He has no grave and is listed on the Thiepval Memorial pier and Face 12C. He was awarded the 1914 Star, British Medal and Victory Medal

The Battle of the Ancre

On 13–18 November, was the final large British attack of the Battle of the Somme in 1916, before the winter weather forced a pause in British attacks until the new year. It was fought by the Fifth Army, under the command of Lieutenant General Hubert Gough, against the German First Army under General von Below. The intent of the British attack was to fulfill complementary objectives. Political discontent in London would be muted by a big victory, as would doubts of British commitment by its allies; British loyalty to the Chantilly strategy of 1915 would be seen to be upheld and the capture of Beaumont Hamel and Serre would go some way to redeem the failure of 1 July and obtain ground on which the British would have a tactical advantage. The attack was the largest in the British sector since September and had a seven-day preliminary bombardment, which was twice as heavy as that of 1 July. Beaumont Hamel, St. Pierre Divion and Beaucourt were captured, which threatened the German hold on Serre further north. Four German divisions had to be relieved due to the number of casualties suffered and over 7,000 German troops were taken prisoner.

PHILLIP DAVID IZZARD was born on 4th September 1924 at St George Hanaover Square Middlesex. He was the son of David Izzard and Emily Maud Graddage. He enlisted in the Royal Air Force and at the time of his death he was Sergeant W.Op Air Gunner. He died aged 19 on 14 February 1944 and is buried at Mill Hill Cemetery Paddington Middlesex Grave No Section D Block 9. I  Know nothing about his death if anyone can help please contact me

ROBERT EARL IZZARD was born 29 July 1891 at Peckham Surrey . He was the son of Robert Izzard and Sarah Mowle. He married Daisy E Weedon at Greenwich in December 1917. He enlisted in the East Kent Regiment at Camberwell Surrey Service No 202147, then transferred to Royal Warkshire Regiment Service No 34031. He was killed in action on 30 August 1918 at Flanders in France. He is buried in Vaulx Hill Cemetery in France Grave No I D 9. He was awarded the British Medal and Victory Medal

RIXON IZZARD was born last quarter of 1895 at Daventry Northamptonshire. He was the son of Ernest Arthur Izzard and Lizzie Rixom. Unfortunately she died in last quarter of 1895 possibly giving birth to Rixom. So in the 1901 Census he is listed as the Adopted son of George and Annie Hutt. He enlisted in the Bedfordshire Regiment 1st Battalion at Northampton. He was killed in action on 29th June 1915 in Flanders France. He first entered France on 6 October 1914. He was awarded the 1914 Star , British Medal and Victory Medal. He has no known grave and is listed on Menim Gate also the Daventry War Memorial.

From Northampton Mercury

16th July 1915

Information has been received at Badby of the death of Private R. Izzard who was shot through the head while on sentry duty near Hill 60 on June 29th. Izzard as a boy attended the Congregational Sunday School at Badby

 

ROY BERNARD IZZARD was born in Reading 3rd quarter 1921. He was the son of Bernard George Izzard and Rebecca Annie Goswell. He enlisted in Cheshire Regiment and served with 8th Army, in North Africa he then went across to Sicilly and took part in the invasion there but was killed in Action 16 July 1943. He is buried in Catania War Cemetery Sicilly Grave No 11 B 49

SIDNEY BRYDON IZZARD  was born in last quarter of 1893 at Ampthill Bedfordshire. He was the son of William Izzard and Ann Braybrooks. Before enlisting he was a Market Gardener.  He enlisted into the Bedfordshire Regiment at Ampthill Bedfordshire Service No 22967. He was killed in action at the Battle of Ancre Flanders France on 13 November 1916. At the time he was in the 4th Battalion and was a Lance Corporal. He is buried in Ancre British Cemetery Beaumont - Hamel, Grave No I A 16. He is also listed on the Maulden War Memorial. He was awarded the British Medal and Victory Medal

SEYMOUR ARCHIBALD IZZARD was born in 1st quarter of 1898 at Chipperfield in Hertfordshire. He was the son of Arthur Izzard and Fanny Elizabeth Lord. He enlisted at Whitehall into the Irish Guards Service No 4557. At the time of his death he was in the 1st Battalion. He was killed in action on 27 August 1918 in the Somme. He was buried in grave IV E 17 at Mory Abbey Military Cemetery Mory France. He is not listed in the Medal Roll. He is listed on the the St Albans World War One memorial

THOMAS HENRY IZZARD was born in 3rd quarter of 1887 at Oxford in Oxfordshire. He was the son of Alfred Izzard and Rose Ludlow. He enlisted into the East Yorkshire Regiment at Oxford Service No 204256. He was killed in action on the Somme on 24 December 1917, just two days before his unit was to pull out of France.. He was buried Heudicourt Communal Cemetery Extension Grave No F 3.He was awarded the British Medal and the Victory Medal

THOMAS IZZARD was born on 8 September 1896 at Woodstock Ontario Canada. He was the son of Edwin and Kate Izzard. He enlisted in the 22nd Oxford (Ontario) Rifles on 3 July 1915. When he died he was in the Canadian Machine Gun Corps 1st Battalion Service No 466241. He died in the Canadian General Hospital Eastbourne Sussex from Influenza and Lobar Pneumonia on 18 December 1918. He is buried in Seaford Cemetery Sussex. Sad that he went through 4 years of the war and then died after it ended

THEODORE DOUGLAS IZZARD was born on 27 December 1917 at Victoria British Columbia Canada, he was the son of Edward Whitaker Izard and Eleanor Douglas. He enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy and at the time of his death was Lieutenant. He died 29 April 1944 on the HMSC Athabaskan in the English Channel. He is listed on the Halifax Memorial Panel 5. He is also listed on a carved wooden plaque inside St Marys Church Slindon Sussex because his grandfather Arthur Izard was the curator of the church. He married Patricia Marie Cather in Emmanuel Church Plymouth Devon on 16 April 1941

 

Halifax Nova Scotia Canada War Memorial Panel 5

HMCS Athabaskan

was the first of three destroyers of the Royal Canadian Navy to bear this name. It was a destroyer of the Tribal class, built in 1940-1941 in the United Kingdom by Vickers Armstrong of Newcastle upon Tyne with Parsons engine works.

The motor cutter of HMCS Haida, which was used to rescue survivors of the sinking of Athabaskan

She was heavily damaged by a Henschel Hs 293 glider bomb during an anti-submarine chase off Cape Ortegal, in the Bay of Biscay, on 27 August 1943. HMS Egret was sunk in the same incident Athabaskan was lost in the English Channel the night of 29 April 1944. She was torpedoed by the German torpedo boat T-24. Her commanding officer - Lieutenant Commander John Stubbs - was killed in action after declining rescue by Haida to swim back for more crew members. 128 crew lost their lives in the sinking; in 2004, the Canadian Navy provided a brass plaque to be laid on the wreck to commemorate the loss. The expedition found more information about the sinking but did not clarify the actual cause. The wreck is in a shattered condition spread over the sea bed.

There does exist some speculation that Athabaskan was in fact lost to a friendly fire incident after being accidentally torpedoed by a British motor torpedo boat, or that she suffered some sort of catastrophic internal explosion in number one boiler room. However, due to the poor condition of the wreck after some 60 or so years of lying in strong currents, as well as the poor record-keeping and incomplete logs of other ships in the area at the time of her sinking, neither of these theories have yet been confirmed Athabaskan Island, near Bella Bella on the Central Coast of British Columbia, was named in memory of Athabaskan.

École John Stubbs Memorial School near Victoria, British Columbia is named for Lieutenant Commander

THOMAS HAROLD ISARD was born in 2nd quarter of 1890 at Paddington. He was the son of George Isard and Martha Ann Cuff. He enlisted at Barry in Glamorgan as a rifleman in the Rifle Brigade Service No S/2379 at the time of enlistment he was employed on the Barry Island Railway Company as a railway brakeman. He first went to France on 22 July 1915. He was killed in action on 3 September 1916 possible at the battle of Guillemont on the Somme. He has no known grave and is listed on the Thiepval Memorial pier and face 16B and 16C.He is also commemorated on a plaque outside the Harbour Master Office in Barry Docks (although i have not been able to find it,  if anyone has a photo of it please let me know ).  He was awarded the 1915 Star, British Medal and Victory Medal. His brother George Alfred was also killed in action see above

THOMAS ISSARD  was born in 3rd quarter of 1895 at Hanley in Staffordshire. He was the son of Thomas Issard and Nellie Ball. He enlisted in the North Staffordshire Regiment at Shelton Staffordshire Service No 4072 at the time he was a Potters Warehouseman. He first went to France 29 June 1915. He was injured and died from his wounds on 15 Oct 1915 in Flanders France. He was awarded the 1915 Star, British Medal and the Victory Medal

THOMAS ISZARD was born in 1895 Islington Middlesex. He was the son of Thomas and Harriett Iszard. He enlisted in Kings Royal Rifle Corps in London. His Service No was A/168  He first entered France on 18 May 1915 At the time of his death he was in the 7th Battalion and was killed in action on 6 August 1915 at Flanders Belgium. He has no known grave and is listed on the Menim Gate Panel 51 & 53. He was awarded the 1915 Star, British Medal and Victory Medal

THOMAS IZZARD was born 3rd quarter 1879 at Clophill Bedfordshire he was the son of Charles Izzard and Elizabeth Kedge. He enlisted into the Bedfordshire Regiment at Bedford Service No 6485. He transferred to the Royal Fusiliers Service No 60168. He died in hospital on 14 January 1917 at Flanders Belgium. He is buried in  Lussenthoek Military Cemetery Poperinge Belgium. He was awarded the British Medal and Victory Medal.

From Luton News and Bedfordshire Chronicle 25th January 1917

DEATH FROM TRENCH FEVER

Pte. Thomas Izzard who was previous to enlistment was engaged as roadsman by the Ampthill RuraL District Council, died in hospital somewhere in France on Sunday week from the effects of trench fever and inflammation of the kidneys. The sad news was conveyed to his widowed mother by his chaplain, who was also in hospital. Deceased was a great favourite throughout the village and neighbourhood. He took much interest in the management of the the Reading  Room, and was prominent in all village cricket matches

 

WILLIAM EDWIN IZZARD was born 3rd quarter 0f 1887 at St Albans Hertfordshire. He was the son of William Edwin Izzard and Ellen Fensome. He had signed up as a regular soldier because in 1911 census he is listed as a Lance Corporal in the 4th Battalion Royal Fusiliers at Corunna Barracks Aldershot Hampshire. , his service no was L/11078. He first entered Le Havre 13 August 1914. He died from wounds received on 27 March 1916 in Flanders France.. He is buried in Grace I 19 at Dickebusch New Militery Cemetery France. He received the1914 Star, British Medal and Victory Medal  

WILLIAM FREDERICK THOMAS BENJAMIN ISZARD was born in 3rd quarter of 1897 at Shoreditch Middlesex. He was the son of Alfred Edward Iszard (Deceased Deceased 1905) and Alice Louise Sales. He enlisted in the Rifle Brigade Service No S/19512 at Canning Town London on 22 January 1916. He was killed in action on 23 April 1917at Flanders France at the time he was a Lance Corporal and in 4th Battalion. He is buried in Trescault Communal Cemetery, at the time this was behind enemy lines so it is possible he was prisoner of war at the time. He was awarded the British Medal and Victory Medal

WILLIAM CHARLES IZZARD was born in 3rd quarter of 1906 at Battle Sussex. He was the son of Charles Craven Izzard and Emily Harriett Peacham. He was married to Violet Hilda .He enlisted into the Royal Armoured Corps Service No 7876645 as a trooper. He was killed in action on 3 July 1942 probably at the Battle of Alamein, at the time he was in the 10th Queens Royal Lancers royal Armoured Corps. He has no known grave but is commemorated on the Alamein Memorial Panel 18

The First Battle of El Alamein (1–27 July 1942) was a battle of the Western Desert Campaign of the Second World War, fought on the northern coast of Egypt between Axis forces (Germany and Italy) of the Panzer Army Africa (Panzerarmee Afrika) commanded by Field Marshal (Generalfeldmarschall) Erwin Rommel, and Allied (specifically British Imperial) forces (Britain, British India, Australia, South Africa and New Zealand) of the British Eighth Army commanded by General Claude Auchinleck. The battle, although a stalemate, halted a second advance by the Axis forces into Egypt. However, an Axis presence near El Alamein only 66 mi (106 km) from Alexandria, was too dangerously close to major population centres and the Suez Canal for the Allied forces to allow the status quo to remain; a Second Battle of El Alamein would be required to drive the Axis armies out of Egypt for good.

WILLIAM GEORGE IZZARD was born in 1910 in Penrith New South Wales Australia, he was the son of George William Izzard Pearl Rule,. George married to Daphne Elizabeth Blanning on 7th March 1931 at Parramatta New South Wales Australia.  He enlisted into the Australian Army, Service No NX56138 in the Medical Corps AIF 2/11 Field Ambulance and served most of his time with 2/2 Machine Gun Battalion.  He was killed in action on 12 July 1942 at the Battle of Alamein. He was buried in Grave A IV C 19 Alamein War Cemetery

 

HENRY WILLIAM IZZARD was born in 3rd quarter of 1898 at Blackboys Ashdown Forest Sussex , he was the son of John Henry Izzard and Mary Ann Lee. He enlisted at Chichester into the Sussex Regiment 2nd Battalion Service No G/13401. He died of wounds on 2 July 1918 in Flanders France. He is buried in Grave V D 15 at Pernes British Cemetery France He was awarded the British Medal and Victory Medal

WILLIAM JESSE IZZARD was born on 16th May 1898 probably at Beech Hill Berkshire and was baptised at St Mary's Church on 3rd July 2015. . He was the son of Charles Izzard and Ruth Allen. He enlisted in the East Surrey Regiment Service at Wimbledon No 3214. He transferred to the 21st (County of London) Battalion 1st Surrey Rifles Service No 653303. He first went to France on 1st September 1916 and was reported missing just 38 days later. He was killed in action in the Somme on 8 October 1916. He has no known grave and is listed on the Thiepval Memorial. He was awarded the British Medal and Victory Medal

Sherfield on Loddon HampshireWar Memorial

 

FROM Loddon Valley Link Church and Communal Magazine

Continuing the series of articles remembering the men recorded on Sherfield War Memorial in the centenary month of their deaths William Jesse Izzard, the only son of Charles and Ruth Izzard, was born in 1899 in Beech Hill, Berkshire. By 1911 the family, including William’s older sister Edith, had moved to Sherfield on Loddon, where Charles Izzard worked as a kitchen gardener. William Izzard’s service record has not survived, but it is likely, given his age, that he enlisted with the 21st Battalion, London Regiment, in 1916. By then his battalion, which formed part of the 2nd London Division, was actively engaged in northern France. In the later phases of the Battle of the Somme, 1916, William’s battalion served in a number of offensives, especially those aimed to gain higher ground from the Germans near Baupaume. It is recorded that on the 8th October 1916 the 21st Battalion sustained particularly high casualties while advancing on German positions defending the Butte de Wariencourt. It is likely that William Izzard, aged 18, died that day, though his body was never recovered. William J. Izzard is remembered on Sherfield-on-Loddon Village War Memorial and on the Thiepval Memorial, where the  names of those with no known grave are recorded.

From Hampshire and Berkshire Gazette 21st July 1917

KILLED IN ACTION  IZZARD – Killed in action in France on October 8th 1916 (previously reported missing) Rifleman William J dearly loved son of Charles and Ruth Izzard Sherfield-on-Loddon aged 18 years 5 months Rest in Peace Beloved

WILLIAM JOHN IZARD was born in 1st quarter of 1895 in Chislehurst Kent. He was the son of William Izard and Eliza Muns. He enlisted at Bromley Kent  in the Queens Own Royal West Kent Regiment Service No G/704. He died from wounds on 6 April 1916 Flanders in France. He is buried in Bethune Town Cemetery France, Grave No III G 34. He was awarded 1915 Star, British Medal and Victory Medal

WILLIAM LYALL IZZARD was born on 3 April 1922 son of William Archibald and Annie  Louise Izzard. He enlisted in the Nova Scotia Highlanders Service No F76355 in October 1942. He was killed in action on 7 June 1944 at the Battle of Authie. He is buried in Grave II A 8 at Beny-Sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery Reviers France

 

BATTLE OF AUTHIE

Authie was a Battle Honour granted to units participating in battles following D-Day during the Battle of Normandy, the first phase of the North-West Europe campaign of the Second World War.

D-Day on 6 June had left the three British and Canadian beachheads reasonably secure, thanks to a slow German response and lower than anticipated casualties, yet the gap between the British 3rd Division and the 3rd Canadian Division was troublesome.  Nonetheless, on D+1, June 7th, wheels were already in motion for energetic armoured counterattacks on the Commonwealth beaches by the 12th SS Panzer Division and 21st Panzer Division. The Canadians, for their part, were concerned with making an all-out push for the final D-Day objective line, code-named OAK, that had not been achieved the previous day. For the Canadians, this was represented in reality by the railway line running parallel to the Caen-Bayeux road, and the airfield at Carpiquet. The 7th Brigade made good progress on their objectives on the morning of June 7th, one battalion becoming the first unit of the entire 2nd British Army to seize their D-Day objectives - though the fighting would turn fierce later in the day. The 9th Brigade had a harder time of it beginning in the early hours of D+1.1

WILLIAM IZZARD was born in 1st quarter 0f 1888 in Litlington Cambridgeshire. He was the son of William Izzard and Emma Monk. He was in the Royal Navy, and in the 1911 Census he was listed as a  stoker ,1st class ,aboard the Battleship HMS London which was in Gibraltar at the time. William married Jane Elizabeth Doran on 16th December 1911 at St Luke's Church Camberwell. He was killed in action on 22 September 1914 on board HMS Aboukir which was sunk by a submarine in the North Sea. He has no grave but is listed on Panel 5 of the Chatham Naval Memorial

HMS ABOUKIR

The Cressy-class vessels had rapidly become obsolete due to the great advances in naval architecture in the years leading up to the First World War. At the outbreak of the war, these ships were mostly staffed by reserve sailors. Aboukir was one of four ships that made up Rear Admiral Henry H Campbell's 7th Cruiser Squadron.

Shortly after the outbreak of the First World War in August 1914, Aboukir and her sister ships - Bacchante, Euryalus, Hogue and Cressy - were assigned to patrol the Broad Fourteens of the North Sea in support of a force of destroyers and submarines based at Harwich which blocked the Eastern end of the English Channel from German warships attempting to attack the supply route between England and France.

At around 06:00 on 22 September, the three cruisers (the flagship Baccante with Rear-Admiral Arthur Christian had had to return to harbour to refuel) were steaming at 10 kn (12 mph; 19 km/h) in line ahead and they were spotted by the German submarine U-9, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Weddigen. Although they were not zigzagging, all of the ships had lookouts posted to search for periscopes and one gun on each side of each ship was manned.

 Weddigen ordered his submarine to submerge and closed the range to the unsuspecting British ships. At close range, he fired a single torpedo at Aboukir. The torpedo broke her back, and she sank within 20 minutes with the loss of 527 men.

The captains of Cressy and Hogue thought Aboukir had struck a floating mine and came forward to assist her. They stood by and began to pick up survivors. At this point, Weddigen fired two torpedoes into Hogue, mortally wounding that ship. As Hogue sank, the captain of Cressy realised that the squadron was being attacked by a submarine, and tried to flee. However, Weddigen fired two more torpedoes into Cressy, and sank her as well.

 The entire battle had lasted less than two hours, and cost the British three warships, 62 officers and 1,397 ratings. This incident established the U-boat as a major weapon in the conduct of naval warfare.